Home / Celebrity Net Worth / Actresses / Raquel Welch Net Worth

Raquel Welch Net Worth: Biography & Wiki in 2017

How rich is Jo Raquel Tejada?

Jo Raquel Tejada net worth is
$35 Million

People also search for

Tahnee Welch (Daughter)

Ursula Andress

Sophia Loren

Ann-Margret

Brigitte Bardot

Rachel Weisz

Raquel Welch Biography & Wiki 2017

Jo Raquel Tejada is a Chicago, Illinois-born American actress and a pop culture icon, who as Raquel Welch is still perhaps best known from her most iconic role in “One Million Years BC” in 1966, in which she appeared in her purposely depleted prehistoric bikini, which captured the hearts of modern men and of course their teenage sons. It went on to be the best selling pin-up poster at that time, and to her being an international sex symbol of 1960s. Born on September 5, 1940 into a family of Bolivian and English ancestry, Raquel has been active in the field of entertainment since 1959.

So just how rich is Raquel Welch? The actress who has continued to be a relevant presence in pop culture, has an estimated net worth of $35 million. In addition to her wealth, she has achieved popularity that’s always helped her hold her place in Hollywood. Obviously, her net worth has come from her very successful acting career.

Raquel Welch Net Worth $35 Million

Raquel’s career began as a performer from the tender age of seven when she took on ballet classes. At the age of 17, she quit ballet after her teacher said her body was not the right type. She started acting in 1959, and concurrently took a job as a weather forecaster at KFMB, San Diego. She played small roles in television series like “Bewitched”, “The Virginian” and “McHale’s Navy”, but her big break came after signing a contract with 20th Century Fox: a leading role in the sci-fi movie “Fantastic Voyage” in early 1966, and then her most iconic role in “One Million Years B.C.” which is regarded as the pillar for her success that’s still relevant today. Raquel is also among the first few who portrayed a female leading role in western movie, “Hannie Caulder”, based on revenge which inspired later revenge movies like “Kill Bill”.

She won a Golden Globe award for best actress for her role in “The Four Musketeers” (1974) – which followed “the Three Musketeers” (1973) – and was also nominated for a Golden Globe for her performance in the television drama “Right to Die” (1987). Welch was due to star in 1982 adaptation of Cannery Row, but was fired a few days into production and replaced by Debra Winger. Welch sued the production team and collected $10.8 million as settlement. Welch received a star on the Holly Wood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard. She was also rewarded for her positive promotion of Americans of Latin heritage.

Apart from acting, Welch also has her hand in different beauty related programs. With her Multi-Platinum collection of fitness and yoga videos and her books with her views on healthy living, nutrition, beauty and style, she has been adding to her wealth. As a business woman she began her line of wigs, jewelry and skin care products. In January 2007 Welch was selected as new face of MAC Cosmetics Beauty Icon series with her line featuring limited edition make up shades.

Regarding her personal live, a mother of two children, Damon Welch and Tahnee Welch, she has been married to James Welch (1959-64), Patrick Curtis (1967-72), Andre Weinfeld (1980-90) and Richard Palmer (1999 – now separated). With all the fame and a significant net worth, Welch has established herself as a relevant and a respectable figure in the pop film culture as of 2015.

People also search for

Damon Welch (Son)

Claudia Cardinale

Jane Fonda

Bo Derek

Gina Lollobrigida


Jo Raquel Tejada Quick Facts

Birth date: September 5, 1940
Birth place: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Profession:Actress, Singer
Nationality:American
Spouse:James Welch (m. 1959–64), Patrick Curtis (m. 1967–72), André Weinfeld (m. 1980–90), Richard Palmer (m. 1999- 2003)
Children:Tahnee Welch, Damon Welch
Parents:Josephine Sarah Hall, Armando Carlos Tejada Urquizo
Awards:Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture Actress in a Musical or Comedy (1974), Hollywood Walk of Fame (1994)
Record labels:20th Century Fox
Nominations:Golden Globe Award for her performance in the television drama (1987), Imagen Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award (2001),
Movies:“One Million Years BC” (1966), "Fantastic Voyage" (1966), "Bedazzled" (1967), "Bandolero!" (1968), "Lady in Cement" (1968), "100 Rifles" (1969), "Myra Breckinridge" (1970)
TV shows:“Bewitched”, “The Virginian”, “McHale’s Navy”
Albums:Raquel Welch / Vladimir Cosma - L'Animal 91977), This Girl's Back In Town (1987), Raquel! (2005)
Books:"Raquel: Beyond the Cleavage" (2010)
facebook.com/TheRealRaquelWelch/
twitter.com/raquel_welch
imdb.com/name/nm0000079
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raquel_Welch


Jo Raquel Tejada Interesting Facts

#Fact
1She is the 21st great granddaughter of King Edward I.
2After Welch starred in One Million Years B.C. (1966) for Hammer movies, they planned a vehicle for her called Mistress of the Seas, a biopic of 18th century pirate Anne Bonney, "The true story of Anne Bonney who slashed her way to fame and fortune alongside the most dreaded scourges of the Caribbean!" This was canned for financial reasons. Surviving poster artwork depicts Welch with a pistol in one hand and a cutlass in the other, very scantily clad.
3Is one of 20 actresses who did not receive an Oscar nomination for their Best Actress in a Comedy/Musical Golden Globe-winning performance; hers being for The Three Musketeers (1973). The others, in chronological order, are: June Allyson for Too Young to Kiss (1951), Ethel Merman for Call Me Madam (1953), Jean Simmons for Guys and Dolls (1955), Taina Elg and Kay Kendall for Les Girls (1957), Marilyn Monroe for Some Like It Hot (1959), Rosalind Russell for A Majority of One (1961) and Gypsy (1962), Patty Duke for Me, Natalie (1969), Twiggy for The Boy Friend (1971), Barbra Streisand for A Star Is Born (1976), Bernadette Peters for Pennies from Heaven (1981), Kathleen Turner for Romancing the Stone (1984) and Prizzi's Honor (1985), Miranda Richardson for Enchanted April (1991), Jamie Lee Curtis for True Lies (1994), Nicole Kidman for To Die For (1995), Madonna for Evita (1996), Renée Zellweger for Nurse Betty (2000), Sally Hawkins for Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and Amy Adams for Big Eyes (2014).
4Was considered for the title role in Norma Rae (1979) but Sally Field was cast instead (she went on to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for her performance and won).
5Her grunting in One Million Years B.C. (1966) was dubbed by Nikki Van der Zyl.
6As of 2013, celebrity spokesperson for Foster Grant sunglasses since the 1960s.
7She was awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California on June 8, 1996.
820th Century Fox wanted her to change her name to Debbie Welch, because they thought Raquel was too difficult to pronounce.
9Has American ancestry on her mother's side, dating back to both John Quincy Adams and the Mayflower. Her father immigrated from La Paz, Bolivia at age 17. His ancestry can be traced back to Armando Carlos Tejada Urquizo, a Bolivian of Spanish ancestry.
10Ten months after the large age gap brought her relationship with Gary Stretch to an end, she dated Los Angeles restaurateur Richard Palmer, who is 15 years her junior. Richard left his fiancée, actress Cathy Moriarty for Raquel after they met in October 1997 at Ago, the West Hollywood restaurant owned by Robert De Niro.
11She was crowned Miss La Jolla and Miss Southern California before dropping out of college in San Diego, California where she had an acting scholarship, to get married to her high-school sweetheart, James Welch, at age 19.
12Revealed that her first marriage was the best of her four.
13[1996] Dated champion boxer Gary Stretch when she was 56 and he was 31. Gary was younger than her two children, Damon Welch and Tahnee Welch. Raquel was also born the same year as Gary's father, Ron Stretch. Their brief romance ended because of their age difference.
14Her younger sister, Gail Tejada, is an ovarian cancer survivor.
15Was named "The Worst Actress of All Time" in Harry Medved and Michael Medved's 1980 book "The Golden Turkey Awards", beating out Candice Bergen, Mamie Van Doren, and even Vera Ralston. Interestingly, her co-star in Bluebeard (1972), Richard Burton, was named "The Worst Actor of All Time" in the same book.
16Her younger brother is Castillo Tejada.
17Was promoted as a sex symbol by her then-husband Patrick Curtis, a film producer and Hollywood press agent.
18[c. 1973] Ex-girlfriend of costume designer Ron Talsky, who also designed her clothes for the films Kansas City Bomber (1972) and The Last of Sheila (1973).
19Ex-stepmother of Damon Curtis.
20Profiled in the book "Film Fatales: Women in Espionage Films and Television, 1962-1973" by Tom Lisanti and Louis Paul (McFarland, 2002).
21Second husband, producer Patrick Curtis, reportedly was one of several infants who took turns playing the baby of Olivia de Havilland in Gone with the Wind (1939).
22In 1970, she accepted the Oscar for "Best Actress in a Supporting Role" on behalf of Goldie Hawn, who wasn't present at the awards ceremony
23One of the bombshells shown in The Shawshank Redemption (1994) (The other two were Rita Hayworth and Marilyn Monroe).
24Son Damon Welch married the daughter of England and Yorkshire cricket legend Fred Trueman.
25Has a home on the private island of Mustique
26Was a former cocktail waitress.
27Her former assistant was Polly Brown.
28Auditioned for the role of Mary Ann Summers in Gilligan's Island (1964), which went to Dawn Wells.
29Had a notorious backstage feud with the indomitable Mae West on the set of Myra Breckinridge (1970).
30Mentioned in the theme song of the 1980s television series The Fall Guy (1981).
31(August 30, 2003) Broke her wrist in a car crash in Los Angeles, California.
32Among her many beauty contest titles were "Miss Photogenic", "Miss Contour" and "Miss Maid of California" - all won while she was in her teens.
33She was fired from Cannery Row (1982) and replaced by Debra Winger. She then sued Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and won a $10 million judgement.
34Husband Richard Palmer is a restaurateur. The couple are now separated.
35Her father, Armando Carlos Tejada Urquizo (1911-1976), was Bolivian.
36Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#18) (1995).
37Attended and graduated from La Jolla High School in La Jolla, California in 1958.
38Miss Fairest of the Fair in San Diego, California in 1958.
39Mother of Tahnee Welch and Damon Welch.
40Born at 2:40pm-CDT.
41After Welch starred in One Million Years B.C. (1966) for Hammer movies, they planned a vehicle for her called Mistress of the Seas, a biopic of 18th century pirate Anne Bonney, "The true story of Anne Bonney who slashed her way to fame and fortune alongside the most dreaded scourges of the Caribbean!" This was canned for financial reasons. Surviving poster artwork depicts Welch with a pistol in one hand and a cutlass in the other, very scantily clad.
42Is one of 20 actresses who did not receive an Oscar nomination for their Best Actress in a Comedy/Musical Golden Globe-winning performance; hers being for The Three Musketeers (1973). The others, in chronological order, are: June Allyson for Too Young to Kiss (1951), Ethel Merman for Call Me Madam (1953), Jean Simmons for Guys and Dolls (1955), Taina Elg and Kay Kendall for Les Girls (1957), Marilyn Monroe for Some Like It Hot (1959), Rosalind Russell for A Majority of One (1961) and Gypsy (1962), Patty Duke for Me, Natalie (1969), Twiggy for The Boy Friend (1971), Barbra Streisand for A Star Is Born (1976), Bernadette Peters for Pennies from Heaven (1981), Kathleen Turner for Romancing the Stone (1984) and Prizzi's Honor (1985), Miranda Richardson for Enchanted April (1991), Jamie Lee Curtis for True Lies (1994), Nicole Kidman for To Die For (1995), Madonna for Evita (1996), Renée Zellweger for Nurse Betty (2000), Sally Hawkins for Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and Amy Adams for Big Eyes (2014).
43Was considered for the title role in Norma Rae (1979) but Sally Field was cast instead (she went on to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for her performance and won).
44Her grunting in One Million Years B.C. (1966) was dubbed by Nikki Van der Zyl.
45As of 2013, celebrity spokesperson for Foster Grant sunglasses since the 1960s.
46She was awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California on June 8, 1996.
4720th Century Fox wanted her to change her name to Debbie Welch, because they thought Raquel was too difficult to pronounce.
48Has American ancestry on her mother's side, dating back to both John Quincy Adams and the Mayflower. Her father immigrated from La Paz, Bolivia at age 17. His ancestry can be traced back to Armando Carlos Tejada Urquizo, a Bolivian of Spanish ancestry.
49Ten months after the large age gap brought her relationship with Gary Stretch to an end, she dated Los Angeles restaurateur Richard Palmer, who is 15 years her junior. Richard left his fiancée, actress Cathy Moriarty for Raquel after they met in October 1997 at Ago, the West Hollywood restaurant owned by Robert De Niro.
50She was crowned Miss La Jolla and Miss Southern California before dropping out of college in San Diego, California where she had an acting scholarship, to get married to her high-school sweetheart, James Welch, at age 19.
51Revealed that her first marriage was the best of her four.
52[1996] Dated champion boxer Gary Stretch when she was 56 and he was 31. Gary was younger than her two children, Damon Welch and Tahnee Welch. Raquel was also born the same year as Gary's father, Ron Stretch. Their brief romance ended because of their age difference.
53Her younger sister, Gail Tejada, is an ovarian cancer survivor.
54Was named "The Worst Actress of All Time" in Harry Medved and Michael Medved's 1980 book "The Golden Turkey Awards", beating out Candice Bergen, Mamie Van Doren, and even Vera Ralston. Interestingly, her co-star in Bluebeard (1972), Richard Burton, was named "The Worst Actor of All Time" in the same book.
55Her younger brother is Castillo Tejada.
56Was promoted as a sex symbol by her then-husband Patrick Curtis, a film producer and Hollywood press agent.
57[c. 1973] Ex-girlfriend of costume designer Ron Talsky, who also designed her clothes for the films Kansas City Bomber (1972) and The Last of Sheila (1973).
58Ex-stepmother of Damon Curtis.
59Profiled in the book "Film Fatales: Women in Espionage Films and Television, 1962-1973" by Tom Lisanti and Louis Paul (McFarland, 2002).
60Second husband, producer Patrick Curtis, reportedly was one of several infants who took turns playing the baby of Olivia de Havilland in Gone with the Wind (1939).
61In 1970, she accepted the Oscar for "Best Actress in a Supporting Role" on behalf of Goldie Hawn, who wasn't present at the awards ceremony
62One of the bombshells shown in The Shawshank Redemption (1994) (The other two were Rita Hayworth and Marilyn Monroe).
63Son Damon Welch married the daughter of England and Yorkshire cricket legend Freddie Trueman.
64Has a home on the private island of Mustique
65Was a former cocktail waitress.
66Her former assistant was Polly Brown.
67Auditioned for the role of Mary Ann Summers in Gilligan's Island (1964), which went to Dawn Wells.
68Had a notorious backstage feud with the indomitable Mae West on the set of Myra Breckinridge (1970).
69Mentioned in the theme song of the 1980s television series The Fall Guy (1981).
70(August 30, 2003) Broke her wrist in a car crash in Los Angeles, California.
71Among her many beauty contest titles were "Miss Photogenic", "Miss Contour" and "Miss Maid of California" - all won while she was in her teens.
72She was fired from Cannery Row (1982) and replaced by Debra Winger. She then sued Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and won a $10 million judgement.
73Husband Richard Palmer is a restaurateur. The couple are now separated.
74Her father, Armando Carlos Tejada Urquizo (1911-1976), was Bolivian.
75Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#18) (1995).
76Attended and graduated from La Jolla High School in La Jolla, California in 1958.
77Miss Fairest of the Fair in San Diego, California in 1958.
78Mother of Tahnee Welch and Damon Welch.
79Born at 2:40pm-CDT.


Jo Raquel Tejada Net Worth & Salary

TitleSalary
Bluebeard (1972)$150,000
Spara forte, più forte... non capisco (1966)$60,000
Bluebeard (1972)$150,000
Spara forte, più forte... non capisco (1966)$60,000


Jo Raquel Tejada Trademarks

#Trademark
1Deep sultry voice
2Voluptuous figure
3Large brown eyes
4Strawberry blonde hair
5Deep sultry voice
6Voluptuous figure
7Large brown eyes
8Strawberry blonde hair


Jo Raquel Tejada Quotes

#Quote
1There was this perception of "Oh, she's just a sexpot. She's just a body. She probably can't walk and chew gum at the same time." In my first couple of movies, I had no dialogue. It was frustrating. And then I started to realize that it came with the territory. Look at somebody like Marilyn Monroe. I always wondered why she seemed so unhappy. Everybody worshipped her and she was so extraordinary and hypnotic on screen. But they never nominated her for any of her musicals or comedies, as good as she was. Because for some reason, somebody with her sex appeal, her indescribable attraction, is rarely taken seriously. Hollywood doesn't honor comedy and it doesn't honor sex appeal. And they definitely don't give awards to either of them. So you always feel a little insecure.
2I think [title designer Maurice Binder] understood what was sexy and what wasn't. He knew how to be sexy without being profane about it, and without being too graphic. I'll be honest, I didn't really understand it at the time. When we were shooting that opening moment in Fathom (1967), it seemed silly to me. They had to explain it to me, and even then I was like, "Okay, fine, whatever you think.".
3... I remember James Coburn once said to me, "You know what's the sexiest thing of all? A little mystery." And he was so right about that. When you put it all out there, there's nothing left to the imagination. So where am I going to participate? I've said this before and I still agree with it, the most erogenous zone is the brain. It's all happening there. Otherwise, it's just body parts.
4[In 2012] I think we've gotten to the point in our culture where we're all sex addicts, literally. We have equated happiness in life with as many orgasms as you can possibly pack in, regardless of where it is that you deposit your love interest. It's just dehumanizing. And I have to honestly say, I think this era of porn is at least partially responsible for it. Where is the anticipation and the personalization? It's all pre-fab now. You have these images coming at you unannounced and unsolicited. It just gets to be so plastic and phony to me. Maybe men respond to that. But is it really better than an experience with a real life girl that he cares about? It's an exploitation of the poor male's libidos. Poor babies, they can't control themselves. I just imagine them sitting in front of their computers, completely annihilated. They haven't done anything, they don't have a job, they barely have ambition anymore. And it makes for laziness and a not very good sex partner. Do they know how to negotiate something that isn't pre-fab and injected directly into their brain?
5I don't care if I'm becoming one of those old fogies who says, "Back in my day we didn't have to hear about sex all the time." Can you imagine? My fantasies were all made up on my own. They're ruining us with all the explanations and the graphicness. Nobody remembers what it's like to be left to form your own ideas about what's erotic and sexual. We're not allowed any individuality. I thought that was the fun of the whole thing. It's my fantasy. I didn't pick it off the Internet somewhere. It's my fantasy.
6You could say a lot of things about [One Million Years B.C. (1966)], but challenging isn't one of them.
7Every day, every day. I have people that handle my fan mail, and every day tons of photos come in, with requests for autographs. The fur bikini [from One Million Years B.C. (1966)] is the perennial one. I do feel very fortunate, because I had no suspicion that a dinosaur movie would ever pay off for me as an actress. I figured, it's going to be swept under the carpet, nobody will ever see it. I had a couple of small children at the time, and I used to take them over to see Ray Harryhausen. He did all the special effects on the movie, all the stop-motion animation, and he's pretty much a science fiction legend. Ray would show my kids all the little figurines he used, all the dinosaurs. And then he'd show them how the animation was done, and they were fascinated. So that's what it seemed like to me. It was great stuff for kids, but maybe not the ideal way for an actress to enter the movie-making scene. I even complained to the studio. I was like, "Please, please don't make me do the dinosaur movie." They were like "No, Raquel, you don't understand. It's a classic. It'll live on forever." Turns out they were right.
8Actually, there was never just one bikini. They made several of them. They were created by this wonderful costume designer, Carl Toms, and he had to do it in triplicate. Because, as he explained it to me, at one point my character would get wet, and then there was a fight scene and blood would get on it. So they had to have several versions of the same costume, and they all had to be formfitting. So he literally designed it around me. Carl just draped me in doeskin, and I stood there while he worked on it with scissors.
9I probably did over think [my lines in One Million Years B.C. (1966)]. Not that it mattered. I went to the director, Don Chaffey, very early in the shoot and said, "Don, may I have a word with you?". And he sighed and said, "Yeah, what is it?". I could tell right away that he was not very interested. "Well, I've read the script," I said, "and I've been thinking..." And he turned to me and said, "Don't." And I thought, okay, that in a nutshell is what it's all about. They don't want to hear anything from me. Just show up in the costume and take orders. He said, "See that rock over there? That's rock A. When I say action, you run from rock A and when you get to the middle of the frame, you look up at the sky like there's a giant turtle growling down at you. You scream, run to rock B and we break for lunch.".
10[Don Chaffey] wasn't unkind as a director. But when I wanted to possibly find ways to enhance my character, to make her more vulnerable or have some kind of backstory, he was not interested. That was the hardest part, to realize that I was really an object. Not just to Don, but to the film industry in general. I was a completely non-verbal object that wasn't allowed to talk more than necessary. And that isn't exactly my personality, as you can now hear.
11[Myra Breckinridge (1970)] was based on a brilliant book by Gore Vidal, about sexual duality and the masculine or feminine aspects of every personality, written about in a way that really hadn't been expressed before. It wasn't traditional male and female stuff. It was talking about homosexuality or lesbianism or whatever. It was about crossing the line and breaking new ground sexually. But the problem with the movie was it had none of the fun and absurdity and truth of that exploration, which was dealt with so effectively in the book. It was just a bunch of weird scenes strung together. It became this sort of Fellini-esque crazy dream that's all over the place. It wasn't the funny adventure it should've been. It was a bizarre adventure with some offensive things in it. A lot of audiences didn't really understand what was going on.
12I did a Q&A after one of the screenings [at Lincoln Center, New York City, in 2012 for Myra Breckinridge (1970)], with Simon Doonan, and at one point he asked me, "Is there nothing you liked about this movie?". And I said, "Well, I liked the experience of it. I enjoyed making it." But there's not much you can do as an actor when a film is falling apart. I couldn't control that the script wasn't coming together. Each rewrite got further and further from making any sense.
13I had read the book, and I thought it was hysterically funny. I knew the studio was making it into a movie, and I heard they were talking to Anne Bancroft about doing the lead. When she turned it down, I called (producer) Richard D. Zanuck and said, "I don't know what kind of actress you're looking for, but it occurred to me after reading the book, if there was a guy who wanted to change himself into a movie star woman" - and that's what this character was about. He begins as Myron, a very gay movie critic who's totally infatuated with all of these swashbuckling heroines. He wanted to switch over and become a woman like that. So I told Dick, "If this guy wanted to become a glamorous female movie star, he might like to look like me." And he said, "Oh my God, you have a point. Let me get (co-producer) David Brown on the line.".
14When I signed on [for Myra Breckinridge (1970)], it was understood that there was not going to be a rape scene. And then of course it suddenly appeared in the script. But it was very vague. They weren't very specific in the description. So I'm wondering if they're going to try something. (Director) Michael Sarne used to torture me on the set a lot. He would come around with this red rectangular box of a certain length and a certain width. And it was clear, you know... what might be in the box. And he'd be like, "I have something here for you." I'd just look away, wouldn't even acknowledge him. Finally, the big day arrives and we're about to shoot the scene and he says, "Well, now is the time." I turn to him and say, "Michael, just drop it! I am not strapping anything on!". And I didn't. He said, "Well, that's not fun." But I wouldn't budge.
15He didn't even know. The poor guy who played Rusty Godowski [Roger Herren], he was like a deer in headlights. He read the script and he was like, "I don't understand this scene." I didn't have the heart to tell him. I was just like, "Yeah, it is a little vague, isn't it?". I just could not make the poor guy more nervous than he was already. When we shot it, I kind of suspended my disbelief and thought, "Well okay, I guess we're doing this. But as long as there's nothing graphic, it'll be okay. I'm just here to play the role." Everything about that movie, the good and the bad, it was if nothing else... a challenge.
16Not everybody is comfortable with my ethnicity. When I first came along in the business, they [20th Century Fox] didn't really like the idea of my name being Raquel. I signed with them and almost immediately they wanted me to change my name. They came to me and said, "We have the solution. We figured it all out. You're going to be Debbie Welch." I think they were paranoid that Raquel sounded too ethnic. And I thought, maybe I should be more paranoid than I am. But I wasn't raised thinking of myself or my background as particularly exotic. I felt very American and middle of the road. I knew that I had a little salsa in my blood, but on my mother's side there was the whole English heritage.
17[20th Century Fox] said it ["Raquel"] was difficult to pronounce, nobody's going to remember it. And they had a point. In school, nobody could pronounce my name. They just called me Rocky. But school kids are one thing, your career as an adult woman is another. I took it as a challenge. I was like, "Well, let's see what happens." You either embrace your identity or you let them force you into homogenizing yourself.
18[Hollywood name-changing] was mostly an American insecurity. Americans were not sure how to deal with the exotic. I was lucky that one of my first movies, One Million Years B.C. (1966) was made in Europe by a British company. The Brits, and a lot of the rest of Europe, seemed to really love exotic women. The fact that I was American and exotic just made me more appealing to them.
19I've always personally been color blind. Growing up, I thought Lena Horne was amazing, and Diahann Carroll was amazing, and I absolutely fell in love with Sidney Poitier. Whether they were black or white or whatever, it wasn't a big thing for me. When I was doing 100 Rifles (1969) and I found out I'd be working with Jim Brown, I was more concerned with whether he could act, because he was primarily known as a football player. But he was great.
20[on her marriage to James Welch] I was crazy in love with him - I was sure the moment I saw him he would be the father of my children. He was beautiful, he had this surly quality, and that was it! We were foolish, we ran away and got married, had two children too quickly. It was a romantic fantasy, which I am really good at.
21[on her daughter Tahnee Welch] She is much more beautiful than I was.
22[on divorcing first husband James Welch] Always having to be a perfect vision can be hard. My first husband was a good person. The second (Patrick Curtis) turned into a Svengali - I felt I was being manipulated. I should never have run off with the two kids (Damon and Tahnee) - I should have been more patient. Even though Jim was being horrible I should have stuck it out. I often say to my sister, "When I look back over my four husbands, he was the best.".
23[In 2008] I have pictures of me at 23 or 24 and I think, "Oh my God, I was really once that size!". But actually, I think my face looks better now.
24My father was a perfectionist. We had to hop to everything and have marvelous table manners. I could only wear navy blue and gray and white. He wanted me to be interested in tennis and horses just like a little princess, but I couldn't stand such things.
25If you have physical attractiveness, you don't have to act.
26[on Mae West] I do think she was a spectacular talent. There's no question she was a comedic genius, but I did, in person, actually feel like she was some kind of a dockworker in drag.
27Americans have always had sex symbols. It'a time-honored tradition and I'm flattered to have been one. But it's hard to have a long, fruitful career once you've been stereotyped that way. That's why I'm proud to say I've endured.
28The mind is an erogenous zone.
29[In 1973] I couldn't stand that my husband was being unfaithful. I am Raquel Welch - understand?
30Being a sex symbol was rather like being a convict.
31Once you get rid of the idea that you must please other people before you please yourself, and you begin to follow your own instincts - only then can you be successful. You become more satisfied, and when you are, other people will tend to be satisfied by what you do.
32There was this perception of "Oh, she's just a sexpot. She's just a body. She probably can't walk and chew gum at the same time." In my first couple of movies, I had no dialogue. It was frustrating. And then I started to realize that it came with the territory. Look at somebody like Marilyn Monroe. I always wondered why she seemed so unhappy. Everybody worshipped her and she was so extraordinary and hypnotic on screen. But they never nominated her for any of her musicals or comedies, as good as she was. Because for some reason, somebody with her sex appeal, her indescribable attraction, is rarely taken seriously. Hollywood doesn't honor comedy and it doesn't honor sex appeal. And they definitely don't give awards to either of them. So you always feel a little insecure.
33I think [title designer Maurice Binder] understood what was sexy and what wasn't. He knew how to be sexy without being profane about it, and without being too graphic. I'll be honest, I didn't really understand it at the time. When we were shooting that opening moment in Fathom (1967), it seemed silly to me. They had to explain it to me, and even then I was like, "Okay, fine, whatever you think.".
34... I remember James Coburn once said to me, "You know what's the sexiest thing of all? A little mystery." And he was so right about that. When you put it all out there, there's nothing left to the imagination. So where am I going to participate? I've said this before and I still agree with it, the most erogenous zone is the brain. It's all happening there. Otherwise, it's just body parts.
35[In 2012] I think we've gotten to the point in our culture where we're all sex addicts, literally. We have equated happiness in life with as many orgasms as you can possibly pack in, regardless of where it is that you deposit your love interest. It's just dehumanizing. And I have to honestly say, I think this era of porn is at least partially responsible for it. Where is the anticipation and the personalization? It's all pre-fab now. You have these images coming at you unannounced and unsolicited. It just gets to be so plastic and phony to me. Maybe men respond to that. But is it really better than an experience with a real life girl that he cares about? It's an exploitation of the poor male's libidos. Poor babies, they can't control themselves. I just imagine them sitting in front of their computers, completely annihilated. They haven't done anything, they don't have a job, they barely have ambition anymore. And it makes for laziness and a not very good sex partner. Do they know how to negotiate something that isn't pre-fab and injected directly into their brain?
36I don't care if I'm becoming one of those old fogies who says, "Back in my day we didn't have to hear about sex all the time." Can you imagine? My fantasies were all made up on my own. They're ruining us with all the explanations and the graphicness. Nobody remembers what it's like to be left to form your own ideas about what's erotic and sexual. We're not allowed any individuality. I thought that was the fun of the whole thing. It's my fantasy. I didn't pick it off the Internet somewhere. It's my fantasy.
37You could say a lot of things about [One Million Years B.C. (1966)], but challenging isn't one of them.
38Every day, every day. I have people that handle my fan mail, and every day tons of photos come in, with requests for autographs. The fur bikini [from One Million Years B.C. (1966)] is the perennial one. I do feel very fortunate, because I had no suspicion that a dinosaur movie would ever pay off for me as an actress. I figured, it's going to be swept under the carpet, nobody will ever see it. I had a couple of small children at the time, and I used to take them over to see Ray Harryhausen. He did all the special effects on the movie, all the stop-motion animation, and he's pretty much a science fiction legend. Ray would show my kids all the little figurines he used, all the dinosaurs. And then he'd show them how the animation was done, and they were fascinated. So that's what it seemed like to me. It was great stuff for kids, but maybe not the ideal way for an actress to enter the movie-making scene. I even complained to the studio. I was like, "Please, please don't make me do the dinosaur movie." They were like "No, Raquel, you don't understand. It's a classic. It'll live on forever." Turns out they were right.
39Actually, there was never just one bikini. They made several of them. They were created by this wonderful costume designer, Carl Toms, and he had to do it in triplicate. Because, as he explained it to me, at one point my character would get wet, and then there was a fight scene and blood would get on it. So they had to have several versions of the same costume, and they all had to be formfitting. So he literally designed it around me. Carl just draped me in doeskin, and I stood there while he worked on it with scissors.
40I probably did over think [my lines in One Million Years B.C. (1966)]. Not that it mattered. I went to the director, Don Chaffey, very early in the shoot and said, "Don, may I have a word with you?". And he sighed and said, "Yeah, what is it?". I could tell right away that he was not very interested. "Well, I've read the script," I said, "and I've been thinking..." And he turned to me and said, "Don't." And I thought, okay, that in a nutshell is what it's all about. They don't want to hear anything from me. Just show up in the costume and take orders. He said, "See that rock over there? That's rock A. When I say action, you run from rock A and when you get to the middle of the frame, you look up at the sky like there's a giant turtle growling down at you. You scream, run to rock B and we break for lunch.".
41[Don Chaffey] wasn't unkind as a director. But when I wanted to possibly find ways to enhance my character, to make her more vulnerable or have some kind of backstory, he was not interested. That was the hardest part, to realize that I was really an object. Not just to Don, but to the film industry in general. I was a completely non-verbal object that wasn't allowed to talk more than necessary. And that isn't exactly my personality, as you can now hear.
42[Myra Breckinridge (1970)] was based on a brilliant book by Gore Vidal, about sexual duality and the masculine or feminine aspects of every personality, written about in a way that really hadn't been expressed before. It wasn't traditional male and female stuff. It was talking about homosexuality or lesbianism or whatever. It was about crossing the line and breaking new ground sexually. But the problem with the movie was it had none of the fun and absurdity and truth of that exploration, which was dealt with so effectively in the book. It was just a bunch of weird scenes strung together. It became this sort of Fellini-esque crazy dream that's all over the place. It wasn't the funny adventure it should've been. It was a bizarre adventure with some offensive things in it. A lot of audiences didn't really understand what was going on.
43I did a Q&A after one of the screenings [at Lincoln Center, New York City, in 2012 for Myra Breckinridge (1970)], with Simon Doonan, and at one point he asked me, "Is there nothing you liked about this movie?". And I said, "Well, I liked the experience of it. I enjoyed making it." But there's not much you can do as an actor when a film is falling apart. I couldn't control that the script wasn't coming together. Each rewrite got further and further from making any sense.
44I had read the book, and I thought it was hysterically funny. I knew the studio was making it into a movie, and I heard they were talking to Anne Bancroft about doing the lead. When she turned it down, I called (producer) Richard D. Zanuck and said, "I don't know what kind of actress you're looking for, but it occurred to me after reading the book, if there was a guy who wanted to change himself into a movie star woman" - and that's what this character was about. He begins as Myron, a very gay movie critic who's totally infatuated with all of these swashbuckling heroines. He wanted to switch over and become a woman like that. So I told Dick, "If this guy wanted to become a glamorous female movie star, he might like to look like me." And he said, "Oh my God, you have a point. Let me get (co-producer) David Brown on the line.".
45When I signed on [for Myra Breckinridge (1970)], it was understood that there was not going to be a rape scene. And then of course it suddenly appeared in the script. But it was very vague. They weren't very specific in the description. So I'm wondering if they're going to try something. (Director) Michael Sarne used to torture me on the set a lot. He would come around with this red rectangular box of a certain length and a certain width. And it was clear, you know... what might be in the box. And he'd be like, "I have something here for you." I'd just look away, wouldn't even acknowledge him. Finally, the big day arrives and we're about to shoot the scene and he says, "Well, now is the time." I turn to him and say, "Michael, just drop it! I am not strapping anything on!". And I didn't. He said, "Well, that's not fun." But I wouldn't budge.
46He didn't even know. The poor guy who played Rusty Godowski [Roger Herren], he was like a deer in headlights. He read the script and he was like, "I don't understand this scene." I didn't have the heart to tell him. I was just like, "Yeah, it is a little vague, isn't it?". I just could not make the poor guy more nervous than he was already. When we shot it, I kind of suspended my disbelief and thought, "Well okay, I guess we're doing this. But as long as there's nothing graphic, it'll be okay. I'm just here to play the role." Everything about that movie, the good and the bad, it was if nothing else... a challenge.
47Not everybody is comfortable with my ethnicity. When I first came along in the business, they [20th Century Fox] didn't really like the idea of my name being Raquel. I signed with them and almost immediately they wanted me to change my name. They came to me and said, "We have the solution. We figured it all out. You're going to be Debbie Welch." I think they were paranoid that Raquel sounded too ethnic. And I thought, maybe I should be more paranoid than I am. But I wasn't raised thinking of myself or my background as particularly exotic. I felt very American and middle of the road. I knew that I had a little salsa in my blood, but on my mother's side there was the whole English heritage.
48[20th Century Fox] said it ["Raquel"] was difficult to pronounce, nobody's going to remember it. And they had a point. In school, nobody could pronounce my name. They just called me Rocky. But school kids are one thing, your career as an adult woman is another. I took it as a challenge. I was like, "Well, let's see what happens." You either embrace your identity or you let them force you into homogenizing yourself.
49[Hollywood name-changing] was mostly an American insecurity. Americans were not sure how to deal with the exotic. I was lucky that one of my first movies, One Million Years B.C. (1966) was made in Europe by a British company. The Brits, and a lot of the rest of Europe, seemed to really love exotic women. The fact that I was American and exotic just made me more appealing to them.
50I've always personally been color blind. Growing up, I thought Lena Horne was amazing, and Diahann Carroll was amazing, and I absolutely fell in love with Sidney Poitier. Whether they were black or white or whatever, it wasn't a big thing for me. When I was doing 100 Rifles (1969) and I found out I'd be working with Jim Brown, I was more concerned with whether he could act, because he was primarily known as a football player. But he was great.
51[on her marriage to James Welch] I was crazy in love with him - I was sure the moment I saw him he would be the father of my children. He was beautiful, he had this surly quality, and that was it! We were foolish, we ran away and got married, had two children too quickly. It was a romantic fantasy, which I am really good at.
52[on her daughter Tahnee Welch] She is much more beautiful than I was.
53[on divorcing first husband James Welch] Always having to be a perfect vision can be hard. My first husband was a good person. The second (Patrick Curtis) turned into a Svengali - I felt I was being manipulated. I should never have run off with the two kids (Damon and Tahnee) - I should have been more patient. Even though Jim was being horrible I should have stuck it out. I often say to my sister, "When I look back over my four husbands, he was the best.".
54[In 2008] I have pictures of me at 23 or 24 and I think, "Oh my God, I was really once that size!". But actually, I think my face looks better now.
55My father was a perfectionist. We had to hop to everything and have marvelous table manners. I could only wear navy blue and gray and white. He wanted me to be interested in tennis and horses just like a little princess, but I couldn't stand such things.
56If you have physical attractiveness, you don't have to act.
57[on Mae West] I do think she was a spectacular talent. There's no question she was a comedic genius, but I did, in person, actually feel like she was some kind of a dockworker in drag.
58Americans have always had sex symbols. It'a time-honored tradition and I'm flattered to have been one. But it's hard to have a long, fruitful career once you've been stereotyped that way. That's why I'm proud to say I've endured.
59The mind is an erogenous zone.
60[In 1973] I couldn't stand that my husband was being unfaithful. I am Raquel Welch - understand?
61Being a sex symbol was rather like being a convict.
62Once you get rid of the idea that you must please other people before you please yourself, and you begin to follow your own instincts - only then can you be successful. You become more satisfied, and when you are, other people will tend to be satisfied by what you do.


Jo Raquel Tejada Pictures

All Jo Raquel Tejada pictures »

Jo Raquel Tejada Won Awards

Won awards

Won awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2001Lifetime Achievement AwardImagen Foundation Awards
1996Star on the Walk of FameWalk of FameMotion PictureAwarded on June 8, 1996 at 7021 Hollywood Blvd.
1983Bronze WranglerWestern Heritage AwardsFictional Television DramaThe Legend of Walks Far Woman (1982)· Roger Gimbel, Lee Levinson, Evan Hunter
1975Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Motion Picture Actress - Musical/ComedyThe Three Musketeers (1973)

Jo Raquel Tejada Nominated Awards

Nominated awards

Nominated awards

YearAwardCeremonyNominationMovieAward shared with
2001ALMA AwardALMA AwardsOutstanding Host of a Variety or Awards Special2000 Hispanic Heritage Awards (2000)· Bobby Cannavale
1999Razzie AwardRazzie AwardsWorst Supporting ActressChairman of the Board (1998)
1988Golden GlobeGolden Globes, USABest Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TVRight to Die (1987)
1968Golden LaurelLaurel AwardsFemale Star9th place.
1967Golden LaurelLaurel AwardsFemale New Face5th place.


Jo Raquel Tejada Filmography

Actress

Actress

TitleYearStatusCharacter
How to Be a Latin Lover2017post-productionCeleste
Date My Dad2017TV Series pre-productionRosa
The Ultimate Legacy2015TV MovieMiss Sally May Anderson
House of Versace2013TV MovieAunt Lucia
CSI: Miami2012TV SeriesVina Navarro
Welcome to the Captain2008TV SeriesCharlene Van Ark / Charlene Van Ness
Forget About It2006Christine DeLee
8 Simple Rules2004TV SeriesJackie
American Family2002TV SeriesAunt Dora
Legally Blonde2001Mrs. Windham Vandermark
Tortilla Soup2001Hortensia
Spin City1997-2000TV SeriesAbby / Abby Lassiter
Folle d'elle1998Jacqueline
Chairman of the Board1998Grace Kosik
Seinfeld1997TV SeriesRaquel Welch
Sabrina, the Teenage Witch1996TV SeriesVesta
C.P.W.1996TV SeriesDianna Brock
Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child1995TV SeriesLa Madrasta
Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman1995TV SeriesDiana Stride
Flashbacks 2: Pop Parade1994Video short
Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult1994Raquel Welch (uncredited)
Hollyrock-a-Bye Baby1993TV MovieShelly Millstone (voice)
Evening Shade1993TV SeriesCynthia Gibson
Torch Song1993TV MoviePaula Eastman
Tainted Blood1993TV MovieElizabeth Hayes
Trouble in Paradise1989TV MovieRachel
Scandal in a Small Town1988TV MovieLeda Beth Vincent
Right to Die1987TV MovieEmily Bauer
Muppet Video: The Kermit and Piggy Story1985VideoRaquel Welch
The Legend of Walks Far Woman1982TV MovieWalks Far Woman
Mork & Mindy1979TV SeriesCaptain Nirvana
Animal1977Jane Gardner
Crossed Swords1977Lady Edith
Mother, Jugs & Speed1976Jugs
The Wild Party1975Queenie
The Four Musketeers: Milady's Revenge1974Constance de Bonancieux
The Three Musketeers1973Constance de Bonacieux
The Last of Sheila1973Alice
Bluebeard1972The Nun
Kansas City Bomber1972K.C. Carr
Fuzz1972Det. Eileen McHenry
Hannie Caulder1971Hannie Caulder
The Beloved1971Elena
Myra Breckinridge1970Myra Breckinridge
The Magic Christian1969Priestess of the Whip
Flareup1969Michele
100 Rifles1969Sarita
Lady in Cement1968Kit Forrest
Bandolero!1968Maria Stoner
The Biggest Bundle of Them All1968Juliana
Bedazzled1967Lust Lilian Lust
Fathom1967Fathom Harvill
The Oldest Profession1967Nini (segment "Belle époque, La")
The Queens1966Elena (segment "Fata Elena")
One Million Years B.C.1966Loana
Shoot Loud, Louder... I Don't Understand1966Tania Montini
Fantastic Voyage1966Cora Peterson
A Swingin' Summer1965Jeri
Do Not Disturb1965Woman in Lobby (uncredited)
The Baileys of Balboa1965TV SeriesBeverly
The Hollywood Palace1964-1965TV SeriesBillboard Girl / Card Girl
Wendy and Me1965TV SeriesLila Harrison
The Rogues1964TV SeriesMiss France
Roustabout1964College Girl (uncredited)
Bewitched1964TV SeriesStewardess
McHale's Navy1964TV SeriesLt. Wilson
The Virginian1964TV SeriesSaloon Girl
A House Is Not a Home1964Call Girl

Soundtrack

Soundtrack

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Dead Bullet2016performer: "I'm Ready To Groove feat. in A Swingin' Summer"
Sabrina, the Teenage Witch1996TV Series performer - 1 episode
The 38th Annual Tony Awards1984TV Special performer: "City Lights", "The Grass Is Always Greener"
The Muppet Show1978TV Series performer - 1 episode
The Wild Party1975performer: "Singapore Sally"
Really Raquel1974TV Special performer: "Let Me Entertain You", "I Am Woman", "You Light Up My Life", "It Ain't Necessarily So", "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight", "Steam Roller"
The Special London Bridge Special1972TV Movie performer: "Rip it up / Lucille / Tutti Frutti / Jenny, Jenny as Janey, Janey / Good Golly Miss Molly / Long Tall Sally as We're gonna have some fun tonight"
A Swingin' Summer1965performer: "I'm Ready to Groove"
Shindig!1965TV Series performer - 1 episode

Producer

Producer

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Hannie Caulder1971executive producer - uncredited
The Sorcerers1967assistant producer - uncredited

Costume Department

Costume Department

TitleYearStatusCharacter
The Sorcerers1967costume supervisor - uncredited

Thanks

Thanks

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Trans Am: Anthropocene2014Short grateful acknowledgment
The Last Circus2010the director wishes to thank
Sex at 24 Frames Per Second2003Video documentary acknowledgment
Biography1995TV Series documentary very special thanks - 1 episode
Flesh and Blood: The Hammer Heritage of Horror1994TV Movie documentary special thanks

Self

Self

TitleYearStatusCharacter
Legends in Light: The Photography of George Hurrell1995TV Movie documentaryHerself - Interviewee
Biography1995TV Series documentaryHerself
Wetten, dass..?1994TV SeriesHerself
Flesh and Blood: The Hammer Heritage of Horror1994TV Movie documentaryHerself
Late Show with David Letterman1994TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Showbiz Today1994TV SeriesHerself
The 66th Annual Academy Awards1994TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
Hollywood Women1993TV Mini-Series documentaryHerself
Bob Hope: The First 90 Years1993TV Movie documentaryHerself
Late Night with David Letterman1986-1993TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 14th Annual CableACE Awards1993TV SpecialHerself
The 21th Annual Friends of Tel Hashomer Gala1992TV MovieHerself - Presenter
The 49th Annual Golden Globe Awards1992TV SpecialHerself
The 5th Annual American Comedy Awards1991TV SpecialHerself
The 48th Annual Golden Globe Awards1991TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
The 16th Annual People's Choice Awards1990TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
Night of 100 Stars III1990TV MovieHerself
Live with Kelly and Michael1990TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Raquel: Body & Mind1989VideoHerself - Host
The 61st Annual Academy Awards1989TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
Lose 10 Lbs. in 3 Weeks1988VideoHerself
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson1968-1988TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The18th Annual Nosotros Golden Eagle Awards1988TV SpecialHerself
The 45th Annual Golden Globe Awards1988TV SpecialHerself - Nominee: Best Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV
The 39th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards1987TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
A Week with Raquel1986VideoHerself
This Girl's Back in Town1986TV MovieHerself
Hour Magazine1986TV SeriesHerself
People Are Talking1986TV SeriesHerself
Evening Magazine1986TV SeriesHerself
Night of 100 Stars II1985TV MovieHerself
The 42nd Annual Golden Globe Awards1985TV SpecialHerself - Host
Fozzie's Muppet Scrapbook1985VideoHerself
Raquel: Total Beauty and Fitness1984VideoHerself - Host
Wogan1984TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 38th Annual Tony Awards1984TV SpecialHerself - Performer
The 55th Annual Academy Awards1983TV SpecialHerself - Co-Presenter: Best Film Editing
CBS Early Morning News1982TV SeriesHerself
The 38th Annual Golden Globe Awards1981TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
From Raquel with Love1980TV MovieHerself
The Muppets Go Hollywood1979TV SpecialHerself (uncredited)
The 51st Annual Academy Awards1979TV Special documentaryHerself - Co- Presenter: Music Awards
That's Hollywood1979TV Series documentaryHerself
The 36th Annual Golden Globes Awards1979TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
Donny and Marie1978TV SeriesHerself
Dinah!1975-1978TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The Muppet Show1978TV SeriesHerself - Special Guest Star
Hollywood's Diamond Jubilee1978TV SpecialHerself - Host
Live Wednesday1978TV SeriesHerself
A Tribute to Neil Simon1978TV MovieHerself
Parkinson1972-1978TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The Road to Eltham1978TV MovieHerself
The 50th Annual Academy Awards1978TV SpecialHerself - Co-Presenter: Documentary Feature and Documentary Short
AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Henry Fonda1978TV Special documentaryHerself (uncredited)
The Bob Hope Comedy Special from Palm Springs1978TV MovieHerself
The 34th Annual Golden Globe Awards1977TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
Saturday Night Live1976TV SeriesHerself - Host / Jane Russell / Various
Rona Looks at Raquel, Liza, Cher and Ann-Margret1975TV MovieHerself
The 47th Annual Academy Awards1975TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Best Cinematography
The 1st Annual People's Choice Awards1975TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Favourite Motion Picture
The Mike Douglas Show1974TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 1974 Annual Las Vegas Entertainment Awards1974TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
The 46th Annual Academy Awards1974TV SpecialHerself - Co-Presenter Best Documentary Feature / Best Documentary Short
Really Raquel1974TV SpecialHerself
The 45th Annual Academy Awards1973TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Best Actress in a Leading Role
V.I.P.-Schaukel1972TV Series documentaryHerself - Guest
The 44th Annual Academy Awards1972TV SpecialHerself - Co-Presenter: Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Laugh-In1971TV SeriesHerself - Guest Performer
The David Frost Show1969-1970TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Night of Nights1970TV MovieHerself
The Dick Cavett Show1970TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Die Cowboy-Stadt1970TV Movie documentaryHerself
Raquel!1970TV MovieHerself
The 42nd Annual Academy Awards1970TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Special Visual Effects, and Accepting Supporting Actress Award for Goldie Hawn
This Is Tom Jones1970TV Series documentaryHerself - Guest
The Bob Hope Show1970TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Will the Real Mr Sellers.....?1969TV Movie documentaryHerself
Bracken's World1969TV SeriesHerself
The Joey Bishop Show1967-1969TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The Dean Martin Show1969TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 41st Annual Academy Awards1969TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
The 40th Annual Academy Awards1968TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
The Bob Hope Christmas Special1968TV SpecialHerself
The Hollywood Palace1967TV SeriesHerself - Singer
The Eamonn Andrews Show1966-1967TV SeriesHerself
What's My Line?1967TV SeriesHerself - Mystery Guest
The 39th Annual Academy Awards1967TV SpecialHerself - Co-Presenter: Best Sound
Think Twentieth1967Documentary shortHerself
Shindig!1965TV SeriesHerself - Singer
The Hollywood Deb Stars of 19651965TV MovieHerself - Deb Star
Cinema1965TV Series documentaryHerself
Home & Family2016TV SeriesHerself
The Talk2013-2016TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Good Day L.A.2013TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson2008-2012TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Lt. Dan Band: For the Common Good2011DocumentaryHerself
Huckabee2010TV SeriesHerself
The 64th Annual Tony Awards2010TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Best Revival of a Musical
The Bonnie Hunt Show2010TV SeriesHerself - Guest
In the House with Peter Bart & Peter Guber2010TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Tavis Smiley2010TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Good Morning America1978-2010TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The Oprah Winfrey Show2010TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Martha2008TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Entertainment Tonight2007-2008TV SeriesHerself
Rachael Ray2007TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The View2007TV SeriesHerself - Guest
Playboy: Celebrity Centerfolds2006TV Movie documentaryHerself
101 Sexiest Celebrity Bodies2005TV MovieHerself
Your World w/ Neil Cavuto2005TV SeriesHerself
The 62nd Annual Golden Globe Awards2005TV Special documentaryHerself - Audience Member
The Best of 'So Graham Norton'2004VideoHerself (uncredited)
Larry King Live2004TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The O'Reilly Factor2004TV SeriesHerself
Naughty Bits2004TV SeriesHerself
Playboy's 50th Anniversary Celebration2003TV Movie documentaryHerself
Raquel Welch Promo Package2003TV MovieHerself
Sex at 24 Frames Per Second2003Video documentaryHerself - Interviewee
100 Years of Hope and Humor2003TV SpecialHerself
The Bronze Screen: 100 Years of the Latino Image in American Cinema2002DocumentaryHerself
2002 ALMA Awards2002TV SpecialHerself
Jim Brown: All American2002TV Movie documentaryHerself (Actor)
Raquel Welch in the Valley of the Dinosaurs2002Video documentary shortHerself
Hollywood Squares1999-2001TV SeriesHerself - Panelist
2001 ALMA Awards2001TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
30 minuts2001TV Series documentaryHerself
2000 Hispanic Heritage Awards2000TV SpecialHerself - Co-Host
Hollywood at Your Feet: The Story of the Chinese Theatre Footprints2000DocumentaryHerself - Host
FY2K: Graham Norton Live1999TV SpecialHerself
Get Bruce1999DocumentaryHerself
The 51st Annual Tony Awards1997TV SpecialHerself - Presenter: Best Featured Actor in a Play
The 42nd Annual Drama Desk Awards1997TV SpecialHerself - Presenter
A Century of Science Fiction1996Video documentaryHerself
Gala de la hispanidad1996TV MovieHerself
Late Night with Conan O'Brien1996TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 1996 Annual Lucy Awards1996TV SpecialHerself
The Tonight Show with Jay Leno1995-1996TV SeriesHerself - Guest
The 68th Annual Academy Awards1996TV SpecialHerself - Audience Member
100 Years of Horror1996TV Series documentaryHerself - Actress / Herself
Oops! The World's Funniest Outtakes 41996TV MovieHerself
Sex, Censorship and the Silver Screen1996TV Series documentaryNarrator
The Beatles: All Together Now1995TV Movie documentaryHerself (uncredited)

Archive Footage

Archive Footage

TitleYearStatusCharacter
A Football Life2016TV SeriesHerself
Inside Edition2016TV Series documentaryHerself
Entertainment Tonight2016TV SeriesHerself
Sinatra: All or Nothing at All2015TV Mini-Series documentaryHerself
Pioneers of Television2014TV Mini-Series documentaryCaptain Nirvana
And the Oscar Goes To...2014TV Movie documentaryHerself
The O'Reilly Factor2008-2014TV SeriesHerself / Loana
Whistleblowers: The Untold Stories2013TV SeriesHerself - Award Winning Actress
Welcome to the Basement2013TV SeriesLust
Top Priority: The Terror Within2012DocumentaryHerself - Award winning actress
American Masters2012TV Series documentaryHerself
Empreintes2011TV Series documentaryHerself
¡Feliz 2010! Cuéntame2009TV MovieHerself
Cuéntame2008TV SeriesHerself
A Company of Players2008Video documentary shortHerself (uncredited)
682008TV Movie documentaryHerself
La rentadora2007TV SeriesHerself
Scenes from the Roundtable2007Video documentary shortHerself
A Brief History of Merchant and Ivory2007Video documentary shortActing Role (uncredited)
Larry King Live: The Greatest Interviews2007VideoHerself
Seinfeld: Inside Look2007TV Series documentary shortHerself
Las 50 imágenes de nuestra vida2006TV MovieHerself
20 to 12006TV Series documentaryHerself
La imagen de tu vida2006TV SeriesHerself
The Dish on Dolls2006Video shortHerself
A Bedazzled Conversation with Harold Ramis2006Video documentary shortLust / Lilian Lust (uncredited)
Barry Humphries on Bedazzled2005Video documentary shortLust / Lilian Lust (uncredited)
Retrosexual: The 80's2004TV Mini-Series documentaryHerself
Bob Hope at 1002003TV Movie documentaryHerself (uncredited)
The Definitive Elvis: The Hollywood Years - Part II: 1962-19692002Video documentaryHerself
The Kid Stays in the Picture2002DocumentaryHerself (uncredited)
Cleopatra: The Film That Changed Hollywood2001TV Movie documentaryHerself (uncredited)
Intimate Portrait2001TV Series documentaryHerself
72nd Annual Academy Awards Pre-Show2000TV SpecialHerself (uncredited)
Hollywood Remembers2000TV Series documentary
Twentieth Century Fox: The Blockbuster Years2000TV Movie documentaryHerself Cora Loana
Hollywood Screen Tests: Take 11999TV Movie documentaryHerself (uncredited)
Kicking & Screaming1995TV Series documentaryHerself
The World of Hammer1994TV Series documentaryLoana
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson1990-1992TV SeriesHerself / Herself - from the Bob Hope NBC Special DON'T SHOOT: IT'S ONLY ME
Memories of 1970-19911991TV Series documentaryHerself
Happy Birthday, Bob: 50 Stars Salute Your 50 Years with NBC1988TV SpecialHerself
The Wandering Company1984TV Movie documentaryQueenie (uncredited)
Of Muppets and Men: The Making of 'The Muppet Show'1981TV Movie documentaryHerself
Margret Dünser, auf der Suche nach den Besonderen1981TV Movie documentaryHerself
Fist of Fear, Touch of Death1980DocumentaryHerself, at the Academy Awards (uncredited)
Bob Hope's Overseas Christmas Tours: Around the World with the Troops - 1941-19721980TV Movie documentaryHerself
Un sorriso, uno schiaffo, un bacio in bocca1975
Texaco Presents: A Quarter Century of Bob Hope on Television1975TV SpecialHerself
The Special London Bridge Special1972TV MovieHerself (uncredited)
The Hollywood Palace1970TV SeriesBillboard Girl
Lionpower from MGM1967ShortJuliana (uncredited)

Is Raquel Welch's Net Worth Deserved?

Check Also

Barbara Stanwyck Net Worth

Ruby Catherine Stevens was born on 16 July 1907, in Brooklyn, New York USA, of …